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NewScientist.com

The NewScientist.com Podcast offers the latest in Science and Technology. Visit their webpage to find a complete listing of many high quality audio programs: http://www.newscientist.com/podcast.ns Also subscribe to the podcast via their RSS feed: http://www.newscientist.com/podcastfeed.ns

Here are descriptions from their website of a few of their Audio Shows related to Environmental Issues:

====>Click to hear "Population bomb or bust?" 29 September 2006

Is a declining birth rate cause for alarm or celebration? Population researcher Anne Ehrlich offers a lifetime of perspective on current trends in demographics. Also this week: An experiment to test if the future can signal the past, and the unexpected physics of ground coffee.

Copyright © 2006 Reed Business Information Ltd, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "The Creation with E.O. Wilson, part 2" 29 September 2006

Celebrated biologist and author E. O. Wilson discusses his efforts to persuade the American evangelical community to join with scientists in preserving the world's biodiversity. Part two of a full-length interview.

Copyright © 2006 Reed Business Information Ltd, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "The Creation with E.O. Wilson, part 1" 28 September 2006

Celebrated biologist and author E. O. Wilson discusses his efforts to persuade the American evangelical community to join with scientists in preserving the world's biodiversity. Part one of a full-length interview.

Copyright © 2006 Reed Business Information Ltd, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Wash away your sins" 08 September 2006

A new study reveals the deep-seated psychological link between moral and physical cleanliness. Also this week: the impact of drug trafficking on conservation and the astounding engine that generates thrust using microwaves instead of moving parts.

Copyright © 2006 Reed Business Information Ltd, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "When the sea goes sour" 04 August 2006

It's not just about climate anymore. Increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is leading to the acidification of the world's oceans with disturbing consequences for marine life. Also this week: The neuroscience of art, and the physics behind a classic Italian dish.

Copyright © 2006 Reed Business Information Ltd, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Earth's Fiery Future" 26 May 2006

Could global warming have serious geological consequences? Some experts say our changing climate is already waking fearsome sleeping giants in Earth's crust. Also this week: using Earthshine to search for ET, and testing new drugs on "zombies"

Copyright © 2006 Reed Business Information Ltd, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Elephants on the Edge" 17 February 2006

After years of mistreatment at the hands of humans, are elephants finally taking their revenge? And the dangers of the world's disappearing river deltas.

Copyright © 2006 Reed Business Information Ltd, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "One big black hole" 10 February 2006

Find out why we might all be living in a 5D black hole, and about the first islands to be evacuated due to rising sea levels.

Copyright © 2006 Reed Business Information Ltd, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Born to believe" 27 January 2006

Why did human evolution find God, and why is our warming world getting less sun?

Copyright © 2006 Reed Business Information Ltd, All Rights Reserved.

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Please visit the NewScientist.com site: http://www.newscientist.com/podcast.ns to find many other valuable audio programs.

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MicrobeWorld Radio

The MicrobeWorld Radio podcast is a daily, 90-second radio series designed to increase public understanding and appreciation of the vital role microbes play on our planet. In addition to the audio episodes, subscribers to the MicrobeWorld Radio podcast will also have access to enhanced versions of the program that allow the listener to view images of the subject matter along with the option to link to external websites with more information on the topic. MicrobeWorld creates one to four enhanced podcasts each month. Podcast subscribers also receive monthly .pdf excerpts from Microbe magazine. Please go to their webpage to find a complete listing of many quality audio programs: http://www.microbeworld.org/look/. Also subscribe to the podcast via their RSS feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/microbeworld

Here are descriptions from their website of a few of their Audio programs related to Environmental Issues:

====>Click to hear "Biowillie" 17 Nov 2006

Biodiesel is a renewable source of fuel that is being strongly promoted by country musician Willie Nelson.

Copyright © 2006 American Society for Microbiology, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "H. Pylori in Drinking Water" 15 Nov 2006

H. Pylori, the microbe that causes stomach ulcers, has been found in drinking water in Bozeman, Montana.

Copyright © 2006 American Society for Microbiology, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Fuel up with biomass"

Scientists are exploring ways to make ethanol out of run-of-the-mill agricultural waste.

Copyright © 2006 American Society for Microbiology, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Powering up the soybean"

Scientists hope that cracking the genetic code of the soybean will reveal clues to making it an environmentally and economically sound source of biofuel.

Copyright © 2006 American Society for Microbiology, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Global warming and the ocean food chain"

Scientists are afraid that as ocean water warms, the currents that mix warm and cold water will become weaker, and the phytoplankton at the bottom of the food chain will be in danger

Copyright © 2006 American Society for Microbiology, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Enzyme power"

Enzymes from fungi and bacteria are driving a new power initiative in the world of hydrogen fuel cells.

Copyright © 2006 American Society for Microbiology, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "New Approaches to Microbial Energy"

In a world dependent on diminishing fossil fuels, microbes may be the key to the future.

Copyright © 2006 American Society for Microbiology, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Katrina and the Microbes"

In addition to the wind and flood damage, New Orleans public health officials were worried about contaminated water.

Copyright © 2006 American Society for Microbiology, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Categorizing Marine Viruses"

Viruses do more than make us sick, they also play a big role in shaping marine communities.

Copyright © 2006 American Society for Microbiology, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Carbon Dioxide and Soil Microbes"

Researchers are working to understand the role of soil microbes in global warming.

Copyright © 2006 American Society for Microbiology, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear " Electric Marine Sediment Microbes"

Ocean buoys can now be powered by microbial fuel cells positioned in marine sediment.

Copyright © 2006 American Society for Microbiology, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Microbe Fuel Cell Design"

Microbes may be great at producing power from many sources, but making them efficient can be a real challenge.

Copyright © 2006 American Society for Microbiology, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Microbe Electric"

Scientists have learned to harness power produced by a simple microbial fuel cell run off sewage and marine muck.

Copyright © 2006 American Society for Microbiology, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Rumen Has It... Cows are Electric"

Researchers are making energy by combining microbes from a cow’s stomach and plant waste in a microbial fuel cell.

Copyright © 2006 American Society for Microbiology, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "From Genomes to Biomes"

Researching genomes can reveal crucial information about the ecosystems in which they exist.

Copyright © 2006 American Society for Microbiology, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Environmental Metagenomics"

Environmental metagenomics is allowing researchers to study the microbes they’re unable to culture in the lab..

Copyright © 2006 American Society for Microbiology, All Rights Reserved.

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Please visit the MicrobeWorld Radio site: http://www.microbeworld.org/look/ to find many other valuable audio programs.

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Climate Change News

The Climate Change News podcast is totally centered around "Climate Change." The program offers new and interviews. Please go to their webpage to find a complete listing of many high quality audio programs: http://www.climatechangenews.org/. Also subscribe to the podcast via their RSS feed: http://www.climatechangenews.org/pod/podnews.xml

Here are descriptions from their website of some of their programs:

====>Click to hear "Interview with Dr. John Harte" 25 May 2006

Feedback loops, Gaia in reverse, Milankovich cycles, crop failure and alarmism.

Copyright © 2006 Climate Change News, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Interview with Dr. Marten Scheffer" 23 May 2006

Dr. Marten Scheffer of Wageningen University on his new research quantifying climate feedback loops.

Copyright © 2006 Climate Change News, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "News for week ending 12/5/2006"

Media duck the big issue, how to put a price on nature's free goods and services, Cameron backpedals, Obviation not Generation and many more...

Copyright © 2006 Climate Change News, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "News for week ending 21/4/2006"

3°C calamity for 3 billion says UK chief scientist, walruses exit stage right, pine smell keeps off climate change, insurers do the math, top boffins rebuke Harper, and UK would be premiers in battle for green crown

Copyright © 2006 Climate Change News, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Interview with Gavin Schmidt, NASA GISS climate scientist" 11 April 2006

Gavin Schmidt of NASA and RealClimate.Org explains the uncertainties of climate prediction, the differences between carbon cycle and climate change modelling and why small 'c' conservatism in science is a good thing.

Copyright © 2006 Climate Change News, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "News for week ending 7/4/2006"

Canadians slash green funding, Pacific turning into a "fizzy drink"-plankton suffer, NASA takes the muzzle off, US states lead and carbon offsets: are they a con?

Copyright © 2006 Climate Change News, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "News for week ending 29/3/2006"

A perceptual tipping point for public opinion? - New adverts push the message home and polls see the result. UK government - more hot air from Brown and Blair the fantasies of a green budget and sustainable capitalism. Sane words from Lester B. Brown and Colin Challen. Lastly, Rising Seas and Will Ferrell as GW on GW.

Copyright © 2006 Climate Change News, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "News for week ending 21/3/2006"

Good news for microgeneration, finger points blame at GW for hurricane intensity, spring coming earlier, insurance industry gets up to speed on climate change, 3/4 of US polled want the feds to do more to stop GW and promote renewables.

Copyright © 2006 Climate Change News, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "News for week ending 14/3/2006"

Climate change coming sooner than expected, alarming rise of greenhouse gases, yet more melting ice, hottest canadian winter, 3 new books on climate change.

Copyright © 2006 Climate Change News, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "News for week ending 08/3/2006"

Canadian forest devasted by beetles, satellite evidence of Antarctic ice loss, record temperatures from Australia, the US and Tibet, and the possiblity of stopping global warming for about 1% of gross world product.

Copyright © 2006 Climate Change News, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "News for week ending 28/2/2006"

New IPCC report, Cape Wind and solar power under attack, industry factors in global warming, US and UK populations willing to make sacrifices to prevent climate change. All this and more in this week's Climate Change News Digest.

Copyright © 2006 Climate Change News, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "News for week ending 21/2/2006"

Melting glaciers, over optimistic climate change predictions, fossil fuel industry government infiltration and expiring moths. All this and more in this week's Climate Change News Digest.

Copyright © 2006 Climate Change News, All Rights Reserved.

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Please visit the Climate Change News site: http://www.climatechangenews.org/ to find many other valuable audio programs.

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WGBH Forum Network

WGBH Forum Network Live and Archived Webcasts of Free Public Lectures in Partnership with Boston's Leading Cultural and Educational Organizations. Presented by WGBH in association with the Lowell Institute.

Please go to the WGBH Forum Network webpage to find a complete listing of many high quality audio programs: http://forum.wgbh.org/wgbh/. Also subscribe to the podcast via their RSS feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/WgbhForumNetworkPodcast

Here are descriptions from their website of a few of their Audio Shows related to Environmental Issues:

====>Click to hear "Plan B 2.0" 05 April 2006

Environmental activist and founder of the Worldwatch Institute Lester Brown, discusses his latest book, Plan B 2.0: Rescuing a Planet Under Stress and A Civilization in Trouble, in which he outlines a rescue plan for a world facing oil and water shortages and the disruptions caused by global climate change.

Copyright © 2006 WGBH Educational Foundation, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Wind Energy in Boston Harbor and Beyond" 12 June 2006
{Real Player Only}

for a free download of Real Player: http://www.real.com/realplayer.html

James Manwell and Jack Wiggin discuss possibilities for harnessing wind power in the immediate environs of the Boston Harbor, and in deeper waters further offshore.

Copyright © 2006 WGBH Educational Foundation, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Saving Coral Reefs and Communities After the Tsunami"
5 June 2006
{Real Player Only}

for a free download of Real Player: http://www.real.com/realplayer.html

Dr. Deborah Brosnan explains the interdependence of humans and the marine environment as demonstrated by the disaster in Southeast Asia.

Copyright © 2006 WGBH Educational Foundation, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Ocean Exploration and Conservation" 30 May 2006
{Real Player Only}

for a free download of Real Player: http://www.real.com/realplayer.html

Dr. Stone relates details of his experiences diving in Antarctica, living in an undersea research station, and doing coral reef research in the remote South Pacific Ocean.

Copyright © 2006 WGBH Educational Foundation, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "This Land: Development in America" 04 May 2006
{Real Player Only}

for a free download of Real Player: http://www.real.com/realplayer.html

Anthony Flint tells the story of development in America and the clash of political, economic and cultural forces that surround it.

Copyright © 2006 WGBH Educational Foundation, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "50 Ways to Save the Ocean" 24 April 2006
{Real Player Only}

for a free download of Real Player: http://www.real.com/realplayer.html

David Helvarg presents his new book, 50 Ways to Save the Ocean.

Copyright © 2006 WGBH Educational Foundation, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Field Notes from a Catastrophe" 06 April 2006

Elizabeth Kolbert approaches the monumental problem of global warming, presenting the personal tales of those who are being affected most now.

Copyright © 2006 WGBH Educational Foundation, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Conservation Medicine: What the Oceans are Telling Us"
23 May 2005


Dr Alonso Aguirre explains the emerging field of conservation medicine and what the ocean can tell us about our health as a species.

Copyright © 2006 WGBH Educational Foundation, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Nantucket Sound Offshore Wind Farm Debate" 05 April 2005

Christopher Lydon moderates a debate concerning the proposed development of America's first offshore wind farm in the shallow waters of Nantucket Sound.

Copyright © 2006 WGBH Educational Foundation, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Assessing the Health of the Environment I" 21 Nov 2005

Robert Watson, chief scientist and director of the Environmentally and Socially Sustainable Development Network of the World Bank, and Chair of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, explores the implications of the 2005 report of the U.N. Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. In part one of this forum, Watson discusses the evidence for global climate change with a panel of scientists. Special thanks to Massachusetts Interfaith Power and Light.

Copyright © 2006 WGBH Educational Foundation, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Assessing the Health of the Environment II" 21 Nov 2005

Robert Watson, chief scientist and director of the Environmentally and Socially Sustainable Development Network of the World Bank, and Chair of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, explores the implications of the 2005 report of the U.N. Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. In part two of this forum, Watson asks what the future of the earth looks like if current climate trends continue, what we have we done to change the global climate, and how we can undo the negative changes we have made to our environment. Special thanks to Massachusetts Interfaith Power and Light.

Copyright © 2006 WGBH Educational Foundation, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Assessing the Health of the Environment III" 21 Nov 2005

Robert Watson, chief scientist and director of the Environmentally and Socially Sustainable Development Network of the World Bank, and Chair of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, explores the implications of the 2005 report of the U.N. Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. In part two of this forum, Watson asks what the future of the earth looks like if current climate trends continue, what we have we done to change the global climate, and how we can undo the negative changes we have made to our environment. Special thanks to Massachusetts Interfaith Power and Light.

Copyright © 2006 WGBH Educational Foundation, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Creating Green Cities" 16 Nov 2005

Peter Smith, Boston Society of Architects
Larissa Brown, chief planner, Goody and Clancy
Kristina Egan, director, Mass Smart Growth Alliance

'Transit oriented development' and 'smart growth' are new initiatives in urban design aimed at creating 'green cities.' Peter Smith of the Boston Society of Architects discusses these movements with Larissa Brown, chief planner for urban design firm Goody and Clancy, and Kristina Egan, director of the Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance. How is it possible to design urban communities that are economically and environmentally sustainable? How do such communities work? Are they coming to your region soon?

Copyright © 2006 WGBH Educational Foundation, All Rights Reserved.

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====> "Blood and Oil: US Dependency on Imported Petroleum" 30 Mar 2005

Nationally renowned expert on US petroleum policy, Michael T. Klare discusses his latest book Blood and Oil: The Dangers and Consequences of America's Growing Dependency on Imported Petroleum.

Crude oil is trading at well over $50 a barrel. Congress has authorized oil exploration in the protected lands on Alaska's north slope, but the reality is that oil reserves there are limited. Given current patterns of consumption, the United States will need to import 60% of the oil it uses by 2010.

Donald Rumsfeld famously declared that the Iraq War had 'nothing to do with oil, literally nothing.' Michael Klare begs to differ, and in his new book Blood and Oil, he presents a compelling assessment of the consequences of American dependence on Middle Eastern oil as the lifeblood of its economy. How do US oil policies impact our domestic well being and our international relations? With worldwide petroleum reserves dwindling, what are we doing to prepare for future energy needs? What should we be doing so that we can stop paying for oil with blood?

Michael Klare is the Five College professor of peace and world security at Hampshire College. The defense correspondent for The Nation and a contributing editor for Current History, he is the author previously of Resource Wars, Rogue States and Nuclear Outlaws, and Low Intensity Warfare.

Copyright © 2006 WGBH Educational Foundation, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Water Wars: Is the Mississippi River Losing the Battle?"
15 Nov 2003
{Real Player Only}

for a free download of Real Player: http://www.real.com/realplayer.html

Douglas Dalgle and Jerry Glover talk about the possibility that the Mississippi River is dying.

Copyright © 2006 WGBH Educational Foundation, All Rights Reserved.



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====>Click to hear "When Smoke Ran Like Water" 12 March 2003
{Real Player Only}

for a free download of Real Player: http://www.real.com/realplayer.html

Devra Davis describes how environmental toxins contribute greatly to diseases and argues for new ways of thinking about health and the environment.

Copyright © 2006 WGBH Educational Foundation, All Rights Reserved.

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Please visit the WGBH Forum Network site: http://forum.wgbh.org/wgbh/ to find many other valuable audio programs.

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Lester Brown - Earth Policy Institute

Lester Brown - The Earth Policy Institute is dedicated to providing a vision of an environmentally sustainable economy -an eco-economy- as well as a roadmap of how to get from here to there. Please go to their webpage: http://www.earth-policy.org/. Also subscribe to their low volume electronic Newsletter at: http://www.earth-policy.org/Subscribe/index.htm

Here are descriptions from their website of several Audio presentations or interviews of Lester Brown and others individuals associated with the Earth Policy Institute:

====>Click to hear "Lester Brown Interview" 21 March 2007

Fenton Communications interview of Lester Brown

Copyright © 2007 Fenton Communications, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "ABC News Video Interview of Lester Brown" 6 February 2007

ABC News Video Interview of Lester Brown [Note: about 30 seconds of advertisement appear before the video].

Copyright © 2007 ABC News, All Rights Reserved.

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====>"Renewable Energy Access Podcast Interview of Lester Brown" 3 August 2006

Renewable Energy Access Podcast Interview of Lester Brown

Copyright © 2007 Renewable Energy Access, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Ben Merens Interview of Lester Brown" 1 January 2007
[Note: You'll need to download a free copy of Realplayer to listen to this audio]

Lester Brown Interview by Wisconsin Public Radio's Ben Merens At Issue with Ben Merens

Copyright © 2007 Wisconsin Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "EcoTalk's Interview of Lester Brown" Part 1 - 11 January 2007

====>Click to hear "EcoTalk's Interview of Lester Brown" Part 2 - 11 January 2007

The Washington Post called Lester Brown of the Earth Policy Institute "one of the world's most influential thinkers." In 1986, the Library of Congress requested his personal papers noting that his writings "have already strongly affected thinking about problems of world population and resources." We all know that Plan A has brought us to our current state. Now it's time for
Plan B 2.0.

Copyright © 2007 EcoTalk, All Rights Reserved.

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"Water Prices Rising Worldwide" by Edwin H. Clark

====>Click to hear "Water Prices Rising Worldwide" 7 March 2007

To read the full text of the above audio: CLICK HERE

Earth Policy Institute; Eco-Economy Update; March 7, 2007; "Water Prices Rising Worldwide" by Edwin H. Clark, II; Media Contact: Reah Janise Kauffman; 202-496-9290x12; rjk(at)earth-policy.org; Research Contact: Janet Larsen; 202-496-9290x14; jlarsen(at)earth-policy.org; Earth Policy Institute; 1350 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 403; Washington, DC 20036; www.earth-policy.org

Copyright © 2007 Earth Policy Institute, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Ethanol: competition between food and fuel?" 20 Sept 2006

====>Click to hear "How To Know What's True" 25 July 2006

====>Click to hear "Rescuing a Planet" 24 July 2006

Interview of Lester Brown by Earth & Sky radio (http://www.earthsky.org) on ethanol and the competition between food and fuel and other topics.

Copyright © 2006 Earth Policy Institute, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Climate Refugee's: Teleconference"

August 16, 2006
Teleconference: Global Warming Forcing U.S. Coastal Population to Move Inland: An Estimated 250,000 Katrina Evacuees Are Now Climate Refugees by Lester Brown. Listen to the teleconference

Copyright © 2006 Earth Policy Institute, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "food vs. fuel"

August 4, 2006
Interview of Lester Brown on NPR's Science Friday (http://www.sciencefriday.com) with Ira Flatow. Topic: food vs. fuel.

Copyright © 2006 Earth Policy Institute, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to Watch 7 Part Video "The Fast Changing World Food Prospect"

May 18, 2006
Presentation (video and pdf) by Lester Brown to Bayer CropScience Forum in Frankfurt

Copyright © 2006 Earth Policy Institute, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Department of Sustainability"

March 13, 2006 Backbone Campaign (http://www.backbonecampaign.org) interview with Lester Brown regarding setting up a Department of Sustainability.

Copyright © 2006 Earth Policy Institute, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Plan B 2.0"

February 22, 2006
Interview of Lester Brown by Todd Neff of the Daily Camera.
http://web.dailycamera.com/audio/science/

Copyright © 2006 Earth Policy Institute, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to Watch Video "Plan B 2.0: Sustainability"

January 18, 2006
Rainforest Alliance lecture on Plan B 2.0 by Lester Brown, taped by Lohas Channel. http://www.lohaschannel.com/

Copyright © 2006 Earth Policy Institute, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Plan B 2.0: China's Economy"

January 13, 2006
Lester Brown discussing China's economy and Plan B 2.0 on Science Friday with Ira Flatow. http://www.sciencefriday.com/

Copyright © 2006 Earth Policy Institute, All Rights Reserved.

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====>Click to hear "Part 1"

====>Click to hear "Part 2"

July 9, 2004
Keynote lecture given at Quaker Friends' Conference. Transcript of lecture and Q&A. Listen to the lecture
Part 1 (19 minutes)
Part 2 (20 minutes)

Copyright © 2006 Earth Policy Institute, All Rights Reserved.

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Please visit the Earth Policy Institute's site: http://www.earth-policy.org to find much other valuable information.

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Hazardous Waste Clean-Up Information (CLU-IN)

The Hazardous Waste Clean-Up Information (CLU-IN) page offers many great Environmental Training Programs in Audio and Video format. Please go to their webpage to find a complete listing of their very technical and informative material: http://www.clu-in.org/live/archive.cfm. Also subscribe to the podcast via their RSS feed: http://www.clu-in.org/live/archive.xml

Hazardous Waste Clean-Up Information (CLU-IN): Internet Seminar Archives

Since 1998, The Hazardous Waste Clean-Up Information (CLU-IN) web site has presented Internet Seminars covering a wide variety of technical topics related to hazardous waste characterization, monitoring, and remediation. For each seminar topic, we have selected the highest-quality offering for placement in our archives. Beginning in May 2005, we began offering these archives via podcast, and this feed contains all seminars archived in the last 6 months. For a complete list of seminars archived since 2000, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/live/archive.cfm. CLU-IN was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) but is intended as a forum for all waste remediation stakeholders. For more information and to view upcoming live offerings, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/studio/

====>Listen to "Use of SADA for Spatial Analysis: Mar 9, 2007 (Part 1 of 2)"

Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA; http://www.tiem.utk.edu/~sada/) is evolving freeware that incorporates tools from environmental assessment fields into an effective problem-solving environment. Robert Stewart, who leads the development of the software at the University of Tennessee, will focus this discussion on using SADA for spatial analysis. This seminar goes beyond the general SADA CLU-IN seminar (archived at: http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/sada_081506/) to show the specific capabilities of SADA for making decisions using correlation, interpolation, and probability; and the caveats for using these methods at hazardous waste sites. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/sada2_030907/

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====>Listen to "Use of SADA for Spatial Analysis: Mar 9, 2007 (Part 2 of 2)"

Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA; http://www.tiem.utk.edu/~sada/) is evolving freeware that incorporates tools from environmental assessment fields into an effective problem-solving environment. Robert Stewart, who leads the development of the software at the University of Tennessee, will focus this discussion on using SADA for spatial analysis. This seminar goes beyond the general SADA CLU-IN seminar (archived at: http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/sada_081506/) to show the specific capabilities of SADA for making decisions using correlation, interpolation, and probability; and the caveats for using these methods at hazardous waste sites. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/sada2_030907/

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====>Listen to "Implementing TMDLs and Trading Through the National Estuary Program: Feb 21, 2007 (Part 1 of 2)"

The National Estuary Program (NEP), established as part of the 1987 amendments to the Clean Water Act, is proud to be celebrating its 20th anniversary of protecting and restoring estuaries of national significance. The program promotes comprehensive planning efforts and actions to help protect 28 designated estuaries deemed to be threatened by pollution, development, or overuse. The NEP uses a proven approach of: focusing on specific watersheds, using science to inform decision-making, emphasizing collaborative problem solving, and involving the public. This Webcast will provide an overview of the NEP and will show how it implements another key Clean Water Act program - the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program. It will include a case study of the Long Island Sound NEP, which has successfully used its Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (CCMP) as the basis for developing a TMDL. The Webcast will also discuss the innovative trading program used in Long Island Sound that is reducing nitrogen loads faster and more cost effectively. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ownep_022107/

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====>Listen to "Implementing TMDLs and Trading Through the National Estuary Program: Feb 21, 2007 (Part 2 of 2)"

The National Estuary Program (NEP), established as part of the 1987 amendments to the Clean Water Act, is proud to be celebrating its 20th anniversary of protecting and restoring estuaries of national significance. The program promotes comprehensive planning efforts and actions to help protect 28 designated estuaries deemed to be threatened by pollution, development, or overuse. The NEP uses a proven approach of: focusing on specific watersheds, using science to inform decision-making, emphasizing collaborative problem solving, and involving the public. This Webcast will provide an overview of the NEP and will show how it implements another key Clean Water Act program - the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program. It will include a case study of the Long Island Sound NEP, which has successfully used its Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (CCMP) as the basis for developing a TMDL. The Webcast will also discuss the innovative trading program used in Long Island Sound that is reducing nitrogen loads faster and more cost effectively. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ownep_022107/

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====>Listen to "Community Action for a Renewed Environment (CARE) National Webcast for the 2007 Request for Proposal: Feb 20, 2007"

This webcast is an opportunity for potential applicants to the CARE cooperative agreement program to learn more about and ask questions about the Request for Initial Proposals that was issued in early February. Visit www.epa.gov/CARE for more information. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/care_022007/

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====>Listen to "Nanotechnology - Metal Remediation: Feb 13, 2007 (Part 1 of 2)"

The Superfund Basic Research Program (SBRP), in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), presents "Nanotechnology - Metal Remediation" the 2nd session of the 2007 edition of Risk-e-Learning "Nanotechnology: Applications and Implications for Superfund." This session will highlight the potential of nanotechnology-based approaches to remove metals from drinking water. Dr. Mason Tomson, Professor of Chemical and Environmental Engineering (Rice University, Houston, TX) will introduce the use of nano-magnetite to remove arsenic from drinking water. Nano-magnetite has been found to be a good adsorbent for arsenate and arsenite. Dr. Tomson overviews results from research at the Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology in collaboration with Drs. Vicki Colvin and Paul Laibinis. The research covered 1) kinetic studies with arsenate and arsenite to various concentrations of nano-magnetite were conducted by a batch process under controlled conditions, 2) the effect of competing ions (chloride, phosphate, sulfate, silica, and bicarbonate) on arsenic adsorption onto nano-magnetite, 3) comparison of nano-magnetite, nano-magnetite and iron, and iron for arsenic adsorption. These three processes were tested on arsenic contaminated water from Brownsville, TX - all achieved the treatment goal in less than one minute with minimum iron residue. Dr. Shas Mattigod, Senior Research Scientist (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA), will introduce his research using functionalized nanoporous ceramic sorbents for removal of mercury and other contaminants. This talk overviews the synthesis of self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous silica (SAMMS) and describes how functionalized surface chemistry can be used for adsorption of particular metal species of mercury, chromium and arsenic. He will also discuss possible application of SAMMS technology to separate actinides from nuclear wastes. Dr. Mattigod will cover treatment costs, waste form stability, and potential applications and commercialization of this approach. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/nano2_021307/

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====>Listen to "Nanotechnology - Metal Remediation: Feb 13, 2007 (Part 2 of 2)"

The Superfund Basic Research Program (SBRP), in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), presents "Nanotechnology - Metal Remediation" the 2nd session of the 2007 edition of Risk-e-Learning "Nanotechnology: Applications and Implications for Superfund." This session will highlight the potential of nanotechnology-based approaches to remove metals from drinking water. Dr. Mason Tomson, Professor of Chemical and Environmental Engineering (Rice University, Houston, TX) will introduce the use of nano-magnetite to remove arsenic from drinking water. Nano-magnetite has been found to be a good adsorbent for arsenate and arsenite. Dr. Tomson overviews results from research at the Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology in collaboration with Drs. Vicki Colvin and Paul Laibinis. The research covered 1) kinetic studies with arsenate and arsenite to various concentrations of nano-magnetite were conducted by a batch process under controlled conditions, 2) the effect of competing ions (chloride, phosphate, sulfate, silica, and bicarbonate) on arsenic adsorption onto nano-magnetite, 3) comparison of nano-magnetite, nano-magnetite and iron, and iron for arsenic adsorption. These three processes were tested on arsenic contaminated water from Brownsville, TX - all achieved the treatment goal in less than one minute with minimum iron residue. Dr. Shas Mattigod, Senior Research Scientist (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA), will introduce his research using functionalized nanoporous ceramic sorbents for removal of mercury and other contaminants. This talk overviews the synthesis of self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous silica (SAMMS) and describes how functionalized surface chemistry can be used for adsorption of particular metal species of mercury, chromium and arsenic. He will also discuss possible application of SAMMS technology to separate actinides from nuclear wastes. Dr. Mattigod will cover treatment costs, waste form stability, and potential applications and commercialization of this approach. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/nano2_021307/

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====>Listen to "Site Investigation and Remediation for Munitions Response Projects: Jan 30, 2007 (Part 1 of 2)"

The Department of Defense (DOD) is currently working on an inventory of former ranges with potential for munitions contamination. There are an estimated 2,000 munitions-contaminated sites located in all 50 states and territories that may affect more than 10 million acres. State and tribal regulatory officials and community stakeholders are routinely required to evaluate DOD cleanup strategies with little, if any, environmentally oriented munitions response experience or guidance. State regulators are increasingly being charged with oversight responsibility for munitions response cleanup projects on other than operational ranges, such as formerly used defense sites (FUDS) and base realignment and closure (BRAC) sites. In addition, DOD project managers and industry will benefit from a greater understanding of state regulator expectations. ITRC's Unexploded Ordnance Team has developed this Internet-based training on the site investigation and site remediation process for munitions response sites on other than operational ranges. This training provides an introduction and overview of the processes, tools, and techniques used in investigation and remediation. These concepts are illustrated using an example munitions response site. During the course of the training, major steps in each process are identified and key regulatory considerations discussed. This training also identifies additional sources for more detailed information on key aspects of investigation and remediation. State regulators and others who need to understand the general processes involved in these critical aspects of the munitions response process will benefit from this training. Related ITRC trainings include Munitions Response Historical Records Review and Geophysical Prove-Outs for Munitions Response Projects. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/uxosisr_013007/

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====>Listen to "Site Investigation and Remediation for Munitions Response Projects: Jan 30, 2007 (Part 2 of 2)"

The Department of Defense (DOD) is currently working on an inventory of former ranges with potential for munitions contamination. There are an estimated 2,000 munitions-contaminated sites located in all 50 states and territories that may affect more than 10 million acres. State and tribal regulatory officials and community stakeholders are routinely required to evaluate DOD cleanup strategies with little, if any, environmentally oriented munitions response experience or guidance. State regulators are increasingly being charged with oversight responsibility for munitions response cleanup projects on other than operational ranges, such as formerly used defense sites (FUDS) and base realignment and closure (BRAC) sites. In addition, DOD project managers and industry will benefit from a greater understanding of state regulator expectations. ITRC's Unexploded Ordnance Team has developed this Internet-based training on the site investigation and site remediation process for munitions response sites on other than operational ranges. This training provides an introduction and overview of the processes, tools, and techniques used in investigation and remediation. These concepts are illustrated using an example munitions response site. During the course of the training, major steps in each process are identified and key regulatory considerations discussed. This training also identifies additional sources for more detailed information on key aspects of investigation and remediation. State regulators and others who need to understand the general processes involved in these critical aspects of the munitions response process will benefit from this training. Related ITRC trainings include Munitions Response Historical Records Review and Geophysical Prove-Outs for Munitions Response Projects. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/uxosisr_013007/

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====>Listen to "Remediation Process Optimization Advanced Training: Jan 25, 2007 (Part 1 of 2)"

Remediation Process Optimization (RPO) is the systematic evaluation and enhancement of site remediation to ensure that human health and the environment are being protected over the long term at minimum risk and cost. Successful remediation managers understand not only technologies to be deployed at sites, but also the underlying technical basis that supports the decision-making process. An understanding of these management methods and techniques taken together will serve as an excellent resource for moving forward on RPO projects. The purpose of this ITRC training is to present an overview of the material covered in five technical fact sheets that ITRC's RPO Team produced to enhance site remediation optimization and decision-making. The training modules provide additional information and techniques to improve project schedules, effectively manage resources, emphasize risk, and discuss tools to efficiently cleanup contaminated sites. The ITRC RPO Fact Sheets provide detailed information on the following topics:Performance-based Management (PBM)Exit StrategyData Management, Analysis, and Visualization TechniquesAnalysis of Above Ground Treatment TechnologiesLife-cycle Cost AnalysisThese fact sheets were developed following the feedback to the RPO team's Technical and Regulatory Guidance Document Remediation Process Optimization: Identifying Opportunities for Enhanced and More Efficient Site Remediation (RPO-1, September 2004) and training, "What is Remediation Process Optimization And How Can It Help Me Identify Opportunities for Enhanced and More Efficient Site Remediation?" (training archive available at http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/rpo_092804/). The document and training archive are recommended as prerequisites for this RPO Advanced Internet-based training course. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/rpofs_012507/

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====>Listen to "Remediation Process Optimization Advanced Training: Jan 25, 2007 (Part 2 of 2)"

Remediation Process Optimization (RPO) is the systematic evaluation and enhancement of site remediation to ensure that human health and the environment are being protected over the long term at minimum risk and cost. Successful remediation managers understand not only technologies to be deployed at sites, but also the underlying technical basis that supports the decision-making process. An understanding of these management methods and techniques taken together will serve as an excellent resource for moving forward on RPO projects. The purpose of this ITRC training is to present an overview of the material covered in five technical fact sheets that ITRC's RPO Team produced to enhance site remediation optimization and decision-making. The training modules provide additional information and techniques to improve project schedules, effectively manage resources, emphasize risk, and discuss tools to efficiently cleanup contaminated sites. The ITRC RPO Fact Sheets provide detailed information on the following topics:Performance-based Management (PBM)Exit StrategyData Management, Analysis, and Visualization TechniquesAnalysis of Above Ground Treatment TechnologiesLife-cycle Cost AnalysisThese fact sheets were developed following the feedback to the RPO team's Technical and Regulatory Guidance Document Remediation Process Optimization: Identifying Opportunities for Enhanced and More Efficient Site Remediation (RPO-1, September 2004) and training, "What is Remediation Process Optimization And How Can It Help Me Identify Opportunities for Enhanced and More Efficient Site Remediation?" (training archive available at http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/rpo_092804/). The document and training archive are recommended as prerequisites for this RPO Advanced Internet-based training course. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/rpofs_012507/

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====>Listen to "Introduction to Nanotechnology - Applications and Implications for Superfund: Jan 18, 2007 (Part 1 of 2)"

The Superfund Basic Research Program (SBRP), in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), presents the 2007 edition of RiskeLearning "Nanotechnology: Applications and Implications for Superfund," a series of online seminars to highlight the potential of nanotechnology to support characterization and remediation of hazardous waste sites as well as explore the potential risks of this new class of compounds. Nanotechnology refers to the development and use of nanomaterials (substances with one dimension less than 100 nanometers) which possess unique optical, magnetic, or electrical properties. Nanomaterials are already appearing in commerce as additives or modifications to industrial and consumer products, and as novel drug delivery agents. Nanotechnologies and nanomaterials are expected to provide major societal and environmental benefits. While governments, industry, and academia are excited about potential benefits that may arise, there is also an acknowledgement of the need to understand and consider potential human health and environmental issues. This session will provide an introduction to the subsequent RiskeLearning seminars by covering definitions, forms and uses of nanotechnology. Superfund-related issues will be discussed including how these materials may be used to detect or treat contaminated media as well as recent efforts by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Toxicology Program (NTP), and the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI). to characterize the risks these materials may pose. The session will feature Dr. Nora Savage, at the EPA's Office of Research and Development as well as Dr. Nigel Walker, at NTP, based at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). The session will be moderated by Dr. William Suk, Director of SBRP at NIEHS. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/nano1_011807/

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====>Listen to "Introduction to Nanotechnology - Applications and Implications for Superfund: Jan 18, 2007 (Part 2 of 2)"

The Superfund Basic Research Program (SBRP), in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), presents the 2007 edition of RiskeLearning "Nanotechnology: Applications and Implications for Superfund," a series of online seminars to highlight the potential of nanotechnology to support characterization and remediation of hazardous waste sites as well as explore the potential risks of this new class of compounds. Nanotechnology refers to the development and use of nanomaterials (substances with one dimension less than 100 nanometers) which possess unique optical, magnetic, or electrical properties. Nanomaterials are already appearing in commerce as additives or modifications to industrial and consumer products, and as novel drug delivery agents. Nanotechnologies and nanomaterials are expected to provide major societal and environmental benefits. While governments, industry, and academia are excited about potential benefits that may arise, there is also an acknowledgement of the need to understand and consider potential human health and environmental issues. This session will provide an introduction to the subsequent RiskeLearning seminars by covering definitions, forms and uses of nanotechnology. Superfund-related issues will be discussed including how these materials may be used to detect or treat contaminated media as well as recent efforts by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Toxicology Program (NTP), and the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI). to characterize the risks these materials may pose. The session will feature Dr. Nora Savage, at the EPA's Office of Research and Development as well as Dr. Nigel Walker, at NTP, based at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). The session will be moderated by Dr. William Suk, Director of SBRP at NIEHS. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/nano1_011807/

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====>Listen to "Using NEMO - Nonpoint Source Education for Municipal Officials - to Advance Watershed Management: Jan 17, 2007 (Part 1 of 2)"

The Nonpoint Source Education for Municipal Officials (NEMO) Program is a national award-winning program that educates local land use decision makers on the links between land use and water resource protection. This Webcast will provide a thorough overview of the methods, impacts and educational offerings of the NEMO Program. The educational offerings, geospatial technology tools including build out scenarios, and local impacts of the Connecticut and other state programs will be discussed. The instructors will also describe the National NEMO Network, an affiliated group of projects in 30 states, which may be available to help your watershed or local community. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ownemo_011707/

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====>Listen to "Using NEMO - Nonpoint Source Education for Municipal Officials - to Advance Watershed Management: Jan 17, 2007 (Part 2 of 2)"

The Nonpoint Source Education for Municipal Officials (NEMO) Program is a national award-winning program that educates local land use decision makers on the links between land use and water resource protection. This Webcast will provide a thorough overview of the methods, impacts and educational offerings of the NEMO Program. The educational offerings, geospatial technology tools including build out scenarios, and local impacts of the Connecticut and other state programs will be discussed. The instructors will also describe the National NEMO Network, an affiliated group of projects in 30 states, which may be available to help your watershed or local community. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ownemo_011707/

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====>Listen to "Revegetation and Restoration of an Oil Contaminated Wetland in Northern New Jersey: Dec 14, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

Removing spilled oil from the environment is difficult, time consuming, and expensive especially if a critical habitat or ecologically sensitive area has been affected. Past removal practices have had extreme deleterious effects on the ecosystem both immediate and long-term to such extent as to question whether removing oil from these sensitive systems are environmentally wise in the first place. This presentation will attempt to show that a carefully supervised cleanup followed by a scientifically driven monitoring program can be effective in removing oil from a sensitive wetland habitat using the Green Pond Oil Spill Removal project as the prime example. This project involved a small flood plain wetland located on the south bank of the Pequannock River in Morris County, New Jersey which was contaminated by oil seeping out of the ground. The source of the oil was from a pipeline that transported oil from the oil fields in western New York State to Bayonne at the turn of the century. The pipeline was abandoned in the 1920's and removed, leaving behind subsurface deposits of spilled oil that contaminated the adjacent wetland during periods of elevated groundwater. Six to eight inches of the native soil horizon was removed as part of the oil spill cleanup effort thereby denuding the wetland. The Revegetation/Restoration commenced with the placement of hemp mat to minimize erosion as all of the stream side vegetation was removed during the cleanup operation followed by the emplacement of coir logs along the stream edge. In the spring of 1999, plantings of potted native shrubs and forbes were installed by a private landscape firm experienced in wetland restoration. A deer fence was placed around the entire site to protect the new plantings A monitoring program for determining the success of the revegetation/restoration effort with Spring and end-of-the-growing season surveys conducted along established transects and throughout the overall site. Species composition and productivity measurements were an integral part of the parameters to measure the progress of the effort to determine comparability between the remediated site and undisturbed wetlands. An Invasive Species Management plan was an integral activity of the Revegetation/ Restoration Project for the Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria), an invasive plant from Northern Europe. Herbivous beetles (Galerucella calmariensis and Galerucella pusilla) were obtained from the State of New Jersey Bio-Control Laboratory and released at the site. The success of this control strategy was monitored using a protocol developed by Dr. Brend Blossey at Cornell University. The presentation will incorporate all that has been learned from the removal activity in terms of How Clean is Clean as applied to an oil contaminated fresh water wetland. This information should be useful for decision makers, responders, and consultants alike when faced with remediating disturbed or contaminated habitats. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ecorestoration3_121406/

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====>Listen to "Revegetation and Restoration of an Oil Contaminated Wetland in Northern New Jersey: Dec 14, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

Removing spilled oil from the environment is difficult, time consuming, and expensive especially if a critical habitat or ecologically sensitive area has been affected. Past removal practices have had extreme deleterious effects on the ecosystem both immediate and long-term to such extent as to question whether removing oil from these sensitive systems are environmentally wise in the first place. This presentation will attempt to show that a carefully supervised cleanup followed by a scientifically driven monitoring program can be effective in removing oil from a sensitive wetland habitat using the Green Pond Oil Spill Removal project as the prime example. This project involved a small flood plain wetland located on the south bank of the Pequannock River in Morris County, New Jersey which was contaminated by oil seeping out of the ground. The source of the oil was from a pipeline that transported oil from the oil fields in western New York State to Bayonne at the turn of the century. The pipeline was abandoned in the 1920's and removed, leaving behind subsurface deposits of spilled oil that contaminated the adjacent wetland during periods of elevated groundwater. Six to eight inches of the native soil horizon was removed as part of the oil spill cleanup effort thereby denuding the wetland. The Revegetation/Restoration commenced with the placement of hemp mat to minimize erosion as all of the stream side vegetation was removed during the cleanup operation followed by the emplacement of coir logs along the stream edge. In the spring of 1999, plantings of potted native shrubs and forbes were installed by a private landscape firm experienced in wetland restoration. A deer fence was placed around the entire site to protect the new plantings A monitoring program for determining the success of the revegetation/restoration effort with Spring and end-of-the-growing season surveys conducted along established transects and throughout the overall site. Species composition and productivity measurements were an integral part of the parameters to measure the progress of the effort to determine comparability between the remediated site and undisturbed wetlands. An Invasive Species Management plan was an integral activity of the Revegetation/ Restoration Project for the Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria), an invasive plant from Northern Europe. Herbivous beetles (Galerucella calmariensis and Galerucella pusilla) were obtained from the State of New Jersey Bio-Control Laboratory and released at the site. The success of this control strategy was monitored using a protocol developed by Dr. Brend Blossey at Cornell University. The presentation will incorporate all that has been learned from the removal activity in terms of How Clean is Clean as applied to an oil contaminated fresh water wetland. This information should be useful for decision makers, responders, and consultants alike when faced with remediating disturbed or contaminated habitats. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ecorestoration3_121406/

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====>Click to hear "Risk Assessment and Risk Management: Determination and Application of Risk-Based Values: Dec 12, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

Assessment of human health risks posed by exposure to hazardous substances is a vital component to the process of remediation of contaminated sites. Risk-based screening values are developed and used in both planning and conducting site remediation. This training course is designed for site managers and others involved in making remedial decisions to help them better understand the risk assessment / risk management process. This training course describes the development and application of risk-based screening values. The first module provides a review of key risk assessment concepts related to risk management. It also introduces the Electronic Risk Resource Fact Sheet developed by the ITRC Risk Assessment Resources team. The second module focuses on the process by which risk-based levels are derived in different states. This module introduces the document,Examination of Risk-Based Screening Values and Approaches of Selected States (RISK-1, 2005), developed by the ITRC Risk Assessment Resources team. The third module examines the application of risk assessment to remediation operations in two case studies providing examples of how risk assessment has actually been implemented, based upon research and case studies conducted by the ITRC Risk Assessment Resources team. This training course describes a number of the reasons behind variations in risk-based screening values and their use in risk management. Overall, the training course enhances the transparency and understanding of risk assessment and its use in remediation. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/risk_121206/

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====>Click to hear "Risk Assessment and Risk Management: Determination and Application of Risk-Based Values: Dec 12, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

Assessment of human health risks posed by exposure to hazardous substances is a vital component to the process of remediation of contaminated sites. Risk-based screening values are developed and used in both planning and conducting site remediation. This training course is designed for site managers and others involved in making remedial decisions to help them better understand the risk assessment / risk management process. This training course describes the development and application of risk-based screening values. The first module provides a review of key risk assessment concepts related to risk management. It also introduces the Electronic Risk Resource Fact Sheet developed by the ITRC Risk Assessment Resources team. The second module focuses on the process by which risk-based levels are derived in different states. This module introduces the document,Examination of Risk-Based Screening Values and Approaches of Selected States (RISK-1, 2005), developed by the ITRC Risk Assessment Resources team. The third module examines the application of risk assessment to remediation operations in two case studies providing examples of how risk assessment has actually been implemented, based upon research and case studies conducted by the ITRC Risk Assessment Resources team. This training course describes a number of the reasons behind variations in risk-based screening values and their use in risk management. Overall, the training course enhances the transparency and understanding of risk assessment and its use in remediation. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/risk_121206/

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====>Click to hear "Integrating Drinking Water into Watershed Protection: Nov 29, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

This Webcast will provide a primer on public water supplies and the recently completed source water assessments mandated by the 1996 Safe Drinking Water Act. Source water is untreated water from streams, rivers, lakes or underground aquifers that is used to provide public drinking water and to supply private wells. While the source water assessments were required and funded, responsibility for implementing protection measures resides at the state, local and utility level. Instructors will discuss how they have integrated source water protection into their programs by using technical assistance, partnerships, tools available through the Clean Water Act and other programs, and by collaborating with watershed and smart growth efforts. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/owintdriwat_112906/

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====>Click to hear "Integrating Drinking Water into Watershed Protection: Nov 29, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

This Webcast will provide a primer on public water supplies and the recently completed source water assessments mandated by the 1996 Safe Drinking Water Act. Source water is untreated water from streams, rivers, lakes or underground aquifers that is used to provide public drinking water and to supply private wells. While the source water assessments were required and funded, responsibility for implementing protection measures resides at the state, local and utility level. Instructors will discuss how they have integrated source water protection into their programs by using technical assistance, partnerships, tools available through the Clean Water Act and other programs, and by collaborating with watershed and smart growth efforts. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/owintdriwat_112906/

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====>Click to hear "Evaluating, Optimizing, or Ending Post-Closure Care at Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Based on Site-Specific Data Evaluations: Nov 16, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

Since 1988, more than 6,100 municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills have closed (see http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/muncpl/pubs/msw05rpt.pdf). Determining when the regulatory post-closure care (PCC) period can be ended for a permitted solid waste disposal facility is one of the greatest challenges facing the solid waste industry in recent times. Using a performance-based process, conducted on a site-specific basis, to determine if a closed landfill poses a threat to human health and the environment provides information necessary to defensibly conclude that the closed landfill does not pose a threat and allows termination of the regulatory post-closure care period. This training, based on ITRC's Technical and Regulatory Guidance: Evaluating, Optimizing, or Ending Post-Closure Care at Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Based on Site-Specific Data Evaluations (ALT-4, 2006), describes a method to evaluate the performance of Post Closure Care at a landfill and determine when leachate recovery, landfill gas management, groundwater monitoring, and cap maintenance can be reduced or even ended based on threats (to human health and the environment) posed by the closed landfill. The training and document describe "custodial care" as those requirements the property owner must follow after post closure care has been ended. They include de minimus site management and care activities including meeting end-use obligations, maintaining institutional control, controlling access, satisfying local ordinances, and fulfilling other applicable regulations and are included as deed restrictions or other enforceable means which follow all land transfers. The training and document focus on Post Closure Care of municipal solid waste landfills. However, Post Closure Care is relevant to closed sites and facilities managed in accordance with a variety of regulatory programs including RCRA, CERCLA, Solid Waste, Brownfields, Voluntary Cleanup, mined land reclamation, and others. Solid waste professionals and other landfill decision makers (e.g. owners; operators; consultants; Federal, state and local government; and the public) should attend this training. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/pcc_111606/

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====>Click to hear "Evaluating, Optimizing, or Ending Post-Closure Care at Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Based on Site-Specific Data Evaluations: Nov 16, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

Since 1988, more than 6,100 municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills have closed (see http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/muncpl/pubs/msw05rpt.pdf). Determining when the regulatory post-closure care (PCC) period can be ended for a permitted solid waste disposal facility is one of the greatest challenges facing the solid waste industry in recent times. Using a performance-based process, conducted on a site-specific basis, to determine if a closed landfill poses a threat to human health and the environment provides information necessary to defensibly conclude that the closed landfill does not pose a threat and allows termination of the regulatory post-closure care period. This training, based on ITRC's Technical and Regulatory Guidance: Evaluating, Optimizing, or Ending Post-Closure Care at Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Based on Site-Specific Data Evaluations (ALT-4, 2006), describes a method to evaluate the performance of Post Closure Care at a landfill and determine when leachate recovery, landfill gas management, groundwater monitoring, and cap maintenance can be reduced or even ended based on threats (to human health and the environment) posed by the closed landfill. The training and document describe "custodial care" as those requirements the property owner must follow after post closure care has been ended. They include de minimus site management and care activities including meeting end-use obligations, maintaining institutional control, controlling access, satisfying local ordinances, and fulfilling other applicable regulations and are included as deed restrictions or other enforceable means which follow all land transfers. The training and document focus on Post Closure Care of municipal solid waste landfills. However, Post Closure Care is relevant to closed sites and facilities managed in accordance with a variety of regulatory programs including RCRA, CERCLA, Solid Waste, Brownfields, Voluntary Cleanup, mined land reclamation, and others. Solid waste professionals and other landfill decision makers (e.g. owners; operators; consultants; Federal, state and local government; and the public) should attend this training. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/pcc_111606/

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====>Click to hear "Real-Time Measurement of Radionuclides in Soil: Nov 14, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sites and some Superfund and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) sites are contaminated with radionuclides. Radioactive contamination is also an issue potentially faced by Homeland Security. Characterization of radionuclides is an expensive and time-consuming process. Using real-time technologies to complete initial screening and characterization of radionuclide contamination results in more timely and cost-effective characterizations. Real-time technologies can also direct excavation resulting in more timely and cost-effective cleanups. The result is earlier protection of human health and the environment. This training introduces state regulators, environmental consultants, site owners, and community stakeholders to ITRC's Technology Overview document Real-Time Measurement of Radionuclides in Soil: Technology and Case Studies (RAD-4, 2006), created by ITRC's Radionuclides Team. This training provides information on the basics of real-time measurement systems (detector types and platforms, location control and mapping technologies, surface and subsurface applications and limitations), how the technologies and data are used (characterization, remediation and closure, decision support, sources and types of uncertainty), acceptance issues (QA/QC, decision framework, uncertainty), and case studies. The purpose is to provide a solid background understanding of the technology itself and the context within which it is used. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/radsrealtime_111406/

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====>Click to hear "Real-Time Measurement of Radionuclides in Soil: Nov 14, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sites and some Superfund and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) sites are contaminated with radionuclides. Radioactive contamination is also an issue potentially faced by Homeland Security. Characterization of radionuclides is an expensive and time-consuming process. Using real-time technologies to complete initial screening and characterization of radionuclide contamination results in more timely and cost-effective characterizations. Real-time technologies can also direct excavation resulting in more timely and cost-effective cleanups. The result is earlier protection of human health and the environment. This training introduces state regulators, environmental consultants, site owners, and community stakeholders to ITRC's Technology Overview document Real-Time Measurement of Radionuclides in Soil: Technology and Case Studies (RAD-4, 2006), created by ITRC's Radionuclides Team. This training provides information on the basics of real-time measurement systems (detector types and platforms, location control and mapping technologies, surface and subsurface applications and limitations), how the technologies and data are used (characterization, remediation and closure, decision support, sources and types of uncertainty), acceptance issues (QA/QC, decision framework, uncertainty), and case studies. The purpose is to provide a solid background understanding of the technology itself and the context within which it is used. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/radsrealtime_111406/

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====>Listen to "Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Environment: Nov 8, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

Although understanding of the the issues of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in the environment is in the early stages of information gathering and data development, even with very limited data there are indications of the potential for some PPCPs to have environmental effects. In light of this, many public and private groups throughout the country are developing actions that can be taken right now to reduce the amount of PPCPs entering the environment. Chen Wen of the Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxics will discuss EPA's stewardship program that helps hospitals reduce pharmaceutical waste. This program is a pilot being conducted in all 10 EPA Regions and provides information and other types of support for these efforts. The program has also developed guidance to assist hospitals in reducing pharmaceutical wastestreams. Karin North of the City of Palo Alto (California) will provide highlights and lessons learned from the May 2006 San Francisco Bay Region pharmaceutical take-back event for residential pharmaceutical waste. This regional event was planned and managed by the Bay Area Pollution Prevention Group (BAPPG) and 17 local Bay Area agencies in cooperation with a retail pharmacy. This event collected over 3600 pounds of pharmaceutical waste at 39 locations. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ppcp4_110806/

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====>Listen to "Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Environment: Nov 8, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

Although understanding of the the issues of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in the environment is in the early stages of information gathering and data development, even with very limited data there are indications of the potential for some PPCPs to have environmental effects. In light of this, many public and private groups throughout the country are developing actions that can be taken right now to reduce the amount of PPCPs entering the environment. Chen Wen of the Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxics will discuss EPA's stewardship program that helps hospitals reduce pharmaceutical waste. This program is a pilot being conducted in all 10 EPA Regions and provides information and other types of support for these efforts. The program has also developed guidance to assist hospitals in reducing pharmaceutical wastestreams. Karin North of the City of Palo Alto (California) will provide highlights and lessons learned from the May 2006 San Francisco Bay Region pharmaceutical take-back event for residential pharmaceutical waste. This regional event was planned and managed by the Bay Area Pollution Prevention Group (BAPPG) and 17 local Bay Area agencies in cooperation with a retail pharmacy. This event collected over 3600 pounds of pharmaceutical waste at 39 locations. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ppcp4_110806/

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====>Listen to "EPA Region 4 Grant Writing Workshop: Nov 7, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

The EPA Region 4 Grant Writing Workshop is designed to assist local governments and nonprofit organizations to better understand the proposal criteria and selection process for EPA's brownfields assessment and cleanup grants. Major workshop agenda topics will include:What are the different grant types EPA provides for brownfields?Who is eligible to apply?What is the grant application process?What are threshold and ranking criteria? What makes a good application? Grant writing tips To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/r4bfgrantwriting_110706/

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====>Listen to "EPA Region 4 Grant Writing Workshop: Nov 7, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

The EPA Region 4 Grant Writing Workshop is designed to assist local governments and nonprofit organizations to better understand the proposal criteria and selection process for EPA's brownfields assessment and cleanup grants. Major workshop agenda topics will include:What are the different grant types EPA provides for brownfields?Who is eligible to apply?What is the grant application process?What are threshold and ranking criteria? What makes a good application? Grant writing tips To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/r4bfgrantwriting_110706/

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====>Listen to "Sediment Remedies: Monitored Natural Recovery — Technical Considerations for Evaluation and Implementation: Oct 30, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

The third in a series of three internet seminars that will provide practical information on how to evaluate the technical suitability of capping, dredging, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) for contaminated sediments. Each seminar focuses on the issues and limitations associated with each option including information on designing remedies that maximize long-term effectiveness and minimize short-term impacts. Participants of the seminars will achieve the following objectives:Learn about the equipment for and design/implementation of capping and dredgingDiscuss key issues in evaluating and monitoring capping, dredging, and MNRBecome familiar about resources, references, and Web sites useful in evaluating sediment remediesOutline:Sediment and Contaminant Processes (D. Reible)Monitored Natural Recovery (V. Magar)Monitoring Remedies (V. Magar)Questions and Answers to follow each instructor's presentationMore information on and registration for the first and second seminars in this series is available through the CLU-IN Studio. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/sedmnr_103006/

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====>Listen to "Sediment Remedies: Monitored Natural Recovery — Technical Considerations for Evaluation and Implementation: Oct 30, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

The third in a series of three internet seminars that will provide practical information on how to evaluate the technical suitability of capping, dredging, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) for contaminated sediments. Each seminar focuses on the issues and limitations associated with each option including information on designing remedies that maximize long-term effectiveness and minimize short-term impacts. Participants of the seminars will achieve the following objectives:Learn about the equipment for and design/implementation of capping and dredgingDiscuss key issues in evaluating and monitoring capping, dredging, and MNRBecome familiar about resources, references, and Web sites useful in evaluating sediment remediesOutline:Sediment and Contaminant Processes (D. Reible)Monitored Natural Recovery (V. Magar)Monitoring Remedies (V. Magar)Questions and Answers to follow each instructor's presentationMore information on and registration for the first and second seminars in this series is available through the CLU-IN Studio. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/sedmnr_103006/

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====>Listen to "Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Environment: Oct 24, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

Once it is known that pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) do occur in the envirnonment, the next question is whether their presence can cause adverse envirnomental effects. This third session of the four part PPCPs webinar will present two studies done by non-EPA researchers that raise questions about potential reproductive effects from wastewater effluent in marine waters and the potential for fluoxetine to disrupt endocrine processes in fish and frogs. Jeffry Armstrong will talk about the results of five years of monitoring done by the Orange County (California) Sanitation District at its deep water marine outfall 8 km off the coast of Southern California. This study has documented that endocrine functions have been compromised in some of the fish collected near this outfall, as well as in reference areas. However, to date indications of population-level effects have not been found. Further research is being planned by the District to continue to better characterize the effects of the release of treated wastewater effluent into coastal waters. Marsha Black of the University of Georgia will discuss the results of her experiments designed to detect endocrine effects of fluoxetine exposure. Fluoxetine is used to treat clinical depression and it has been detected in surface waters at low levels and is known to accumulate in the tissues of fish within effluent dominated streams. It has the potential to affect a number of endocrine-mediated processes including spawning, reproduction, and thyroid mediated development. These experiments demonstrated not only that fluoxetine has the potential to disrupt endocrine processes in fish and frogs but that more targeted studies that measure endocrine biomarkers or endpoints on the exposed organisms are needed. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ppcp3_102406/

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====>Listen to "Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Environment: Oct 24, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

Once it is known that pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) do occur in the envirnonment, the next question is whether their presence can cause adverse envirnomental effects. This third session of the four part PPCPs webinar will present two studies done by non-EPA researchers that raise questions about potential reproductive effects from wastewater effluent in marine waters and the potential for fluoxetine to disrupt endocrine processes in fish and frogs. Jeffry Armstrong will talk about the results of five years of monitoring done by the Orange County (California) Sanitation District at its deep water marine outfall 8 km off the coast of Southern California. This study has documented that endocrine functions have been compromised in some of the fish collected near this outfall, as well as in reference areas. However, to date indications of population-level effects have not been found. Further research is being planned by the District to continue to better characterize the effects of the release of treated wastewater effluent into coastal waters. Marsha Black of the University of Georgia will discuss the results of her experiments designed to detect endocrine effects of fluoxetine exposure. Fluoxetine is used to treat clinical depression and it has been detected in surface waters at low levels and is known to accumulate in the tissues of fish within effluent dominated streams. It has the potential to affect a number of endocrine-mediated processes including spawning, reproduction, and thyroid mediated development. These experiments demonstrated not only that fluoxetine has the potential to disrupt endocrine processes in fish and frogs but that more targeted studies that measure endocrine biomarkers or endpoints on the exposed organisms are needed. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ppcp3_102406/

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====>Listen to "Sediment Remedies: Dredging — Technical Considerations for Evaluation and Implementation: Oct 23, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

The second in a series of three internet seminars that will provide practical information on how to evaluate the technical suitability of capping, dredging, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) for contaminated sediments. Each seminar focuses on the issues and limitations associated with each option including information on designing remedies that maximize long-term effectiveness and minimize short-term impacts. Participants of the seminars will achieve the following objectives:Learn about the equipment for and design/implementation of capping and dredgingDiscuss key issues in evaluating and monitoring capping, dredging, and MNRBecome familiar about resources, references, and Web sites useful in evaluating sediment remediesOutline:Dredging Equipment, Processes, and Operation (M. Palermo)Dredging Control Measures and Management (N. Francingues)Questions and Answers to follow each instructor's presentationMore information on and registration for the first and third seminars in this series is available through the CLU-IN Studio. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/seddredging_102306/

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====>Listen to "Sediment Remedies: Dredging — Technical Considerations for Evaluation and Implementation: Oct 23, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

The second in a series of three internet seminars that will provide practical information on how to evaluate the technical suitability of capping, dredging, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) for contaminated sediments. Each seminar focuses on the issues and limitations associated with each option including information on designing remedies that maximize long-term effectiveness and minimize short-term impacts. Participants of the seminars will achieve the following objectives:Learn about the equipment for and design/implementation of capping and dredgingDiscuss key issues in evaluating and monitoring capping, dredging, and MNRBecome familiar about resources, references, and Web sites useful in evaluating sediment remediesOutline:Dredging Equipment, Processes, and Operation (M. Palermo)Dredging Control Measures and Management (N. Francingues)Questions and Answers to follow each instructor's presentationMore information on and registration for the first and third seminars in this series is available through the CLU-IN Studio. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/seddredging_102306/

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====>Listen to "Sediment Remedies: Capping — Technical Considerations for Evaluation and Implementation: Oct 17, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

The first in a series of three internet seminars that will provide practical information on how to evaluate the technical suitability of capping, dredging, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) for contaminated sediments. Each seminar focuses on the issues and limitations associated with each option including information on designing remedies that maximize long-term effectiveness and minimize short-term impacts. Participants of the seminars will achieve the following objectives:Learn about the equipment for and design/implementation of capping and dredgingDiscuss key issues in evaluating and monitoring capping, dredging, and MNRBecome familiar about resources, references, and Web sites useful in evaluating sediment remediesOutline:Capping Materials and Design (D. Reible)Capping Equipment and Operation (M. Palermo)Questions and Answers to follow each instructor's presentationMore information on and registration for the second and third seminars in this series is available through the CLU-IN Studio. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/sedcapping_101706/

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====>Listen to "Sediment Remedies: Capping — Technical Considerations for Evaluation and Implementation: Oct 17, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

The first in a series of three internet seminars that will provide practical information on how to evaluate the technical suitability of capping, dredging, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) for contaminated sediments. Each seminar focuses on the issues and limitations associated with each option including information on designing remedies that maximize long-term effectiveness and minimize short-term impacts. Participants of the seminars will achieve the following objectives:Learn about the equipment for and design/implementation of capping and dredgingDiscuss key issues in evaluating and monitoring capping, dredging, and MNRBecome familiar about resources, references, and Web sites useful in evaluating sediment remediesOutline:Capping Materials and Design (D. Reible)Capping Equipment and Operation (M. Palermo)Questions and Answers to follow each instructor's presentationMore information on and registration for the second and third seminars in this series is available through the CLU-IN Studio. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/sedcapping_101706/

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====>Listen to "Understanding the Brownfields Proposal Guidelines: Oct 17, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

The Understanding the Brownfields Proposal Guidelines is designed to assist local governments and nonprofit organizations to better understand the proposal criteria and selection process for EPA's brownfields assessment and cleanup grants. Major workshop agenda topics will include: What are the different grant types EPA provides for brownfields?Who is eligible to apply?What is the grant application process?What are threshold and ranking criteria?What makes a good application? Grant writing tips To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/R7BFGuidelines_101706/

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====>Listen to "Understanding the Brownfields Proposal Guidelines: Oct 17, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

The Understanding the Brownfields Proposal Guidelines is designed to assist local governments and nonprofit organizations to better understand the proposal criteria and selection process for EPA's brownfields assessment and cleanup grants. Major workshop agenda topics will include: What are the different grant types EPA provides for brownfields?Who is eligible to apply?What is the grant application process?What are threshold and ranking criteria?What makes a good application? Grant writing tips To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/R7BFGuidelines_101706/

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====>Listen to "Getting Started in Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring: Oct 11, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

Throughout the world, trained volunteers provide an invaluable service: monitoring and providing data on the quality of rivers, streams, lakes, estuaries, and wetlands. This session will provide a primer on starting a volunteer water quality program. Instructors will discuss key steps to follow, questions to ponder, examples of success stories, and where the best resources are for further information. They will also introduce a tiered approach to ensure the best use of volunteer-collected data. The data use tiers are defined by the purpose of the program, the intended use of its data, and the intended data users. Also, learn about World Water Monitoring Day, celebrated every October to raise awareness about the importance of water quality monitoring (http://www.worldwatermonitoringday.org/). To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/owvolwq_101106/

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====>Listen to "Getting Started in Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring: Oct 11, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

Throughout the world, trained volunteers provide an invaluable service: monitoring and providing data on the quality of rivers, streams, lakes, estuaries, and wetlands. This session will provide a primer on starting a volunteer water quality program. Instructors will discuss key steps to follow, questions to ponder, examples of success stories, and where the best resources are for further information. They will also introduce a tiered approach to ensure the best use of volunteer-collected data. The data use tiers are defined by the purpose of the program, the intended use of its data, and the intended data users. Also, learn about World Water Monitoring Day, celebrated every October to raise awareness about the importance of water quality monitoring (http://www.worldwatermonitoringday.org/). To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/owvolwq_101106/

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====>Listen to "Uses of Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA): Oct 11, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is free software that incorporates tools from environmental assessment fields into an effective problem solving environment. These tools include integrated modules for visualization, geospatial analysis, statistical analysis, human health risk assessment, ecological risk assessment, cost/benefit analysis, sampling design, and decision analysis. This seminar will highlight the tools uses, but is not a tutorial for the software. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/sada_101106/

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====>Listen to "Uses of Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA): Oct 11, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is free software that incorporates tools from environmental assessment fields into an effective problem solving environment. These tools include integrated modules for visualization, geospatial analysis, statistical analysis, human health risk assessment, ecological risk assessment, cost/benefit analysis, sampling design, and decision analysis. This seminar will highlight the tools uses, but is not a tutorial for the software. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/sada_101106/

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====>Listen to "Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Environment: Oct 10, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

A common question on pharmaceticals and personal care products (PPCPs) is which of the thousands of chemicals called PPCPs should be looked at first. This second session of the four part PPCPs webinar will present research done in EPA's Office of Research and Development that looked at pieces of this complex issue. Mitch Kostich will cover an innovative approach being evaluated for prioritizing pharmaceuticals for more research on their toxicological properties and potential adverse environmental effects. In this informatics method, ecological impacts are estimated using information from regulatory filings and the scientific literature. Additional data on the use, biotransformation, and chemicals properties are used to further refine the estimate and produce a score that can assist in prioritizing research. Susan Glassmeyer discusses work done to identify the chemical compounds in wastewater treatment plant discharges. Many chemicals were found, including pharmaceuticals, surfactants, and fecal sterols. Although one of the focuses of the research was whether these chemicals could be used as tracers of human fecal pollution, as many as 17 pharmaceuticals were identified in the samples and 9 of these were found in at least 50% of the samples. Additionally, study results on the 35 most frequently detected compounds in the wastewater effluent and their downstream persistence, as well information on whether disinfection processes could remove some of the PPCPs will be discussed. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ppcp2_101006/

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====>Listen to "Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Environment: Oct 10, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

A common question on pharmaceticals and personal care products (PPCPs) is which of the thousands of chemicals called PPCPs should be looked at first. This second session of the four part PPCPs webinar will present research done in EPA's Office of Research and Development that looked at pieces of this complex issue. Mitch Kostich will cover an innovative approach being evaluated for prioritizing pharmaceuticals for more research on their toxicological properties and potential adverse environmental effects. In this informatics method, ecological impacts are estimated using information from regulatory filings and the scientific literature. Additional data on the use, biotransformation, and chemicals properties are used to further refine the estimate and produce a score that can assist in prioritizing research. Susan Glassmeyer discusses work done to identify the chemical compounds in wastewater treatment plant discharges. Many chemicals were found, including pharmaceuticals, surfactants, and fecal sterols. Although one of the focuses of the research was whether these chemicals could be used as tracers of human fecal pollution, as many as 17 pharmaceuticals were identified in the samples and 9 of these were found in at least 50% of the samples. Additionally, study results on the 35 most frequently detected compounds in the wastewater effluent and their downstream persistence, as well information on whether disinfection processes could remove some of the PPCPs will be discussed. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ppcp2_101006/

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====>Listen to "Jump-Starting Ecological Restoration - Soil Health: Oct 5, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

Summary: Any restoration effort is only as good as the soil that it is built on. The goal of this Internet Seminar is to provide site managers with the basics of soil science and with available tools to build a beautiful soil in a single season. Examples of projects where different residuals have been used to create a healthy soil environment on contaminated sites will be presented. This approach is both cost effective and ecological friendly. By taking this Internet Seminar, participants will gain the tools necessary to evaluate the conditions of the soils at their sites, identify locally available and cost-effective residuals that would effectively improve these soils, and gain familiarity with a number of different application options for incorporating these amendments into site soils. The potential for amendments to be used for in situ remediation will be clear through the case studies. As managers are being faced with both reduced resources and the need to consider end uses of sites, this type of approach is an essential first step towards ecological restoration. Background: In December 2001, EPA's Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) launched the Revitalization Initiative. As with the EPA's Brownfields' pilot projects, OSWER recognized that reuse and redevelopment considerations should be incorporated in all of OSWER's cleanup programs. The Land Revitalization Office was formed to ensure coordination occurs across all OSWER offices to achieve the Agency's land use goals. The group serves as an advocate for reuse and revitalization of formerly contaminated land. They provide coordination on programmatic, policy, and regional implementation issues across all OSWER waste programs. The Land Revitalization Office develops methods to advocate, improve, and streamline OSWER reuse programs, tests new ways of conducting business, and assesses program trends to better determine further directions to enhance waste programs cleanup and reuse. This training is sponsored by EPA's Land Revitalization Office. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ecorestoration2_100506/

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====>Listen to "Jump-Starting Ecological Restoration - Soil Health: Oct 5, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

Summary: Any restoration effort is only as good as the soil that it is built on. The goal of this Internet Seminar is to provide site managers with the basics of soil science and with available tools to build a beautiful soil in a single season. Examples of projects where different residuals have been used to create a healthy soil environment on contaminated sites will be presented. This approach is both cost effective and ecological friendly. By taking this Internet Seminar, participants will gain the tools necessary to evaluate the conditions of the soils at their sites, identify locally available and cost-effective residuals that would effectively improve these soils, and gain familiarity with a number of different application options for incorporating these amendments into site soils. The potential for amendments to be used for in situ remediation will be clear through the case studies. As managers are being faced with both reduced resources and the need to consider end uses of sites, this type of approach is an essential first step towards ecological restoration. Background: In December 2001, EPA's Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) launched the Revitalization Initiative. As with the EPA's Brownfields' pilot projects, OSWER recognized that reuse and redevelopment considerations should be incorporated in all of OSWER's cleanup programs. The Land Revitalization Office was formed to ensure coordination occurs across all OSWER offices to achieve the Agency's land use goals. The group serves as an advocate for reuse and revitalization of formerly contaminated land. They provide coordination on programmatic, policy, and regional implementation issues across all OSWER waste programs. The Land Revitalization Office develops methods to advocate, improve, and streamline OSWER reuse programs, tests new ways of conducting business, and assesses program trends to better determine further directions to enhance waste programs cleanup and reuse. This training is sponsored by EPA's Land Revitalization Office. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ecorestoration2_100506/

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====>Listen to "SMARTe Demonstration for Regional Grantees: Oct 3, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

SMARTe is a web-based decision support tool that is being cooperatively developed by EPA, the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council (ITRC), and the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. It is being developed to allow stakeholders to evaluate alternative reuse options for a potentially contaminated site or area. SMARTe integrates the complexities of environmental, social and economic issues in a multi-criteria decision analysis framework. SMARTe is being developed in a phased approach so that some information/tools are available now - prior to completion of the overall decision support tool. This presentation will provide an introduction to SMARTe and then an interactive demonstration with the instructor guiding the users through the SMARTe website. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/smarte_100306/

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====>Listen to "SMARTe Demonstration for Regional Grantees: Oct 3, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

SMARTe is a web-based decision support tool that is being cooperatively developed by EPA, the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council (ITRC), and the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. It is being developed to allow stakeholders to evaluate alternative reuse options for a potentially contaminated site or area. SMARTe integrates the complexities of environmental, social and economic issues in a multi-criteria decision analysis framework. SMARTe is being developed in a phased approach so that some information/tools are available now - prior to completion of the overall decision support tool. This presentation will provide an introduction to SMARTe and then an interactive demonstration with the instructor guiding the users through the SMARTe website. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/smarte_100306/

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====>Listen to "Planning and Promoting of Ecological Reuse of Remediated Sites: Sep 28, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

The design and construction of the ecological end-use as an integrated component of the remediation system will realize pronounced benefits. Ecological elements considered at the inception of planning for environmental remediation at Superfund, RCRA, and Brownfield sites can be a cost-effective and an efficient way to restore, create, and improve wildlife habitat or the ecological system of the site. Incorporation of ecological elements can benefit multiple stakeholders, such as regulatory agencies, the regulated community (industry), local communities, and the general public. This training is based on the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guideline: Planning and Promoting Ecological Land Reuse of Remediated Sites (ECO-2, 2006). The document presents a process to promote ecological land reuse activities considering natural or green technologies instead of more traditional remedies. The guidance demonstrates that natural or ecological end-uses are valuable alternatives to conventional property development or redevelopment. It contains the principal decision points in a flow diagram format and discusses the practicality of applying natural or green technologies to traditional remediation processes. Natural and green technologies have the attributes to improve the ecology of the site as long as it is coincident with the intent of the lands use and does not jeopardize the elimination or reduction of the human or environmental risk. Ecological benefits and a process for calculating their value are included in the guidance and reviewed in this training. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/ecoreuse_092806/

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====>Listen to "Planning and Promoting of Ecological Reuse of Remediated Sites: Sep 28, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

The design and construction of the ecological end-use as an integrated component of the remediation system will realize pronounced benefits. Ecological elements considered at the inception of planning for environmental remediation at Superfund, RCRA, and Brownfield sites can be a cost-effective and an efficient way to restore, create, and improve wildlife habitat or the ecological system of the site. Incorporation of ecological elements can benefit multiple stakeholders, such as regulatory agencies, the regulated community (industry), local communities, and the general public. This training is based on the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guideline: Planning and Promoting Ecological Land Reuse of Remediated Sites (ECO-2, 2006). The document presents a process to promote ecological land reuse activities considering natural or green technologies instead of more traditional remedies. The guidance demonstrates that natural or ecological end-uses are valuable alternatives to conventional property development or redevelopment. It contains the principal decision points in a flow diagram format and discusses the practicality of applying natural or green technologies to traditional remediation processes. Natural and green technologies have the attributes to improve the ecology of the site as long as it is coincident with the intent of the lands use and does not jeopardize the elimination or reduction of the human or environmental risk. Ecological benefits and a process for calculating their value are included in the guidance and reviewed in this training. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/ecoreuse_092806/

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====>Listen to "Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Environment: Sep 26, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

The U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD) is hosting a series of Internet webcasts throughout the fall on pharmaceuticals in the environment. This first webcast on pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in the environment provides an overview of the issue as well as an idea of what activities are occuiring in the EPA Regions. Pharmaceuticals comprise a large and varied group of chemicals, including human and veterinary medicines, which enter the environment in many ways, e.g., excretion, bathing, and disposal of unused medications. As trace components in water, sediment, and soils, these chemicals are largely unregulated in the U.S. The concentrations of these chemicals can vary from parts per billion or less in water, to orders of magnitude higher in biosolids from waste water treatment plants, and manure from concentrated animal feeding operations. The first presentation during this seminar focuses on what is known and not known regarding the occurrence of pharmaceuticals in the environment, effects on wildlife, and the relevance of drug residues on risk perception regarding sources of drinking water. Efforts are underway at the national level to coordinate among the federal agencies through a task force whose efforts will be described. The complete abstract for this first presentation is available (32K/1p/PDF). Following the EPA National Regional Science Council (NRSC) identification of PPCPs as a science need on which ORD should focus, a cross-Regional team on PPCPs was formed. The Regions identified several research questions: (1) Is there evidence of harm to human health or the environment at PPCPs levels that are detectable? (2) What are the sources of PPCPs in the environment? (3) Can PPCP sources be controlled or reduced? (4) What are the most important PPCPs to monitor? (5) What existing analytical methods should be used? (6) What is known about PPCP fate and transport? (7) Are there valid exposure and/or effects tests? The Cross-Regional PPCPs Team also identified examples where research is currently underway to investigate PPCPs. Several Regions are working with ORD and/or their state and local partners to develop chemical analytical methodologies, perform field evaluations of waste water treatment plant effluents, field test new gene-expression assays of exposure to endocrine active compounds, and funding various stewardship activities. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ppcp1_092606/

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====>Listen to "Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Environment: Sep 26, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

The U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD) is hosting a series of Internet webcasts throughout the fall on pharmaceuticals in the environment. This first webcast on pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in the environment provides an overview of the issue as well as an idea of what activities are occuiring in the EPA Regions. Pharmaceuticals comprise a large and varied group of chemicals, including human and veterinary medicines, which enter the environment in many ways, e.g., excretion, bathing, and disposal of unused medications. As trace components in water, sediment, and soils, these chemicals are largely unregulated in the U.S. The concentrations of these chemicals can vary from parts per billion or less in water, to orders of magnitude higher in biosolids from waste water treatment plants, and manure from concentrated animal feeding operations. The first presentation during this seminar focuses on what is known and not known regarding the occurrence of pharmaceuticals in the environment, effects on wildlife, and the relevance of drug residues on risk perception regarding sources of drinking water. Efforts are underway at the national level to coordinate among the federal agencies through a task force whose efforts will be described. The complete abstract for this first presentation is available (32K/1p/PDF). Following the EPA National Regional Science Council (NRSC) identification of PPCPs as a science need on which ORD should focus, a cross-Regional team on PPCPs was formed. The Regions identified several research questions: (1) Is there evidence of harm to human health or the environment at PPCPs levels that are detectable? (2) What are the sources of PPCPs in the environment? (3) Can PPCP sources be controlled or reduced? (4) What are the most important PPCPs to monitor? (5) What existing analytical methods should be used? (6) What is known about PPCP fate and transport? (7) Are there valid exposure and/or effects tests? The Cross-Regional PPCPs Team also identified examples where research is currently underway to investigate PPCPs. Several Regions are working with ORD and/or their state and local partners to develop chemical analytical methodologies, perform field evaluations of waste water treatment plant effluents, field test new gene-expression assays of exposure to endocrine active compounds, and funding various stewardship activities. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ppcp1_092606/

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====>Listen to "Jump-Starting Ecological Restoration: Sep 21, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

Summary: The goal of this Internet Seminar is to examine the relevance and importance of ecological restoration in the Superfund program and to discuss implementation strategies and specific techniques to speed the recovery of disturbed and contaminated land. By taking this Internet seminar, participants will learn why ecological restoration is important to the Superfund program; gain an understanding of the relationship between land disturbance, functioning ecological systems, and how restoration projects are managed; and learn various techniques. The seminar also will address in-situ remediation of metal contaminated soils. In short, participants can expect to learn how to jump-start restoration at a site. Background: In December 2001, EPA's Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) launched the Revitalization Initiative. As with the EPA's Brownfields' pilot projects, OSWER recognized that reuse and redevelopment considerations should be incorporated in all of OSWER's cleanup programs. The Land Revitalization Office was formed to ensure coordination occurs across all OSWER offices to achieve the Agency's land use goals. The group serves as an advocate for reuse and revitalization of formerly contaminated land. They provide coordination on programmatic, policy, and regional implementation issues across all OSWER waste programs. The Land Revitalization Office develops methods to advocate, improve, and streamline OSWER reuse programs, tests new ways of conducting business, and assesses program trends to better determine further directions to enhance waste programs cleanup and reuse. This training is sponsored by EPA's Land Revitalization Staff. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ecorestoration4_092106/

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====>Listen to "Jump-Starting Ecological Restoration: Sep 21, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

Summary: The goal of this Internet Seminar is to examine the relevance and importance of ecological restoration in the Superfund program and to discuss implementation strategies and specific techniques to speed the recovery of disturbed and contaminated land. By taking this Internet seminar, participants will learn why ecological restoration is important to the Superfund program; gain an understanding of the relationship between land disturbance, functioning ecological systems, and how restoration projects are managed; and learn various techniques. The seminar also will address in-situ remediation of metal contaminated soils. In short, participants can expect to learn how to jump-start restoration at a site. Background: In December 2001, EPA's Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) launched the Revitalization Initiative. As with the EPA's Brownfields' pilot projects, OSWER recognized that reuse and redevelopment considerations should be incorporated in all of OSWER's cleanup programs. The Land Revitalization Office was formed to ensure coordination occurs across all OSWER offices to achieve the Agency's land use goals. The group serves as an advocate for reuse and revitalization of formerly contaminated land. They provide coordination on programmatic, policy, and regional implementation issues across all OSWER waste programs. The Land Revitalization Office develops methods to advocate, improve, and streamline OSWER reuse programs, tests new ways of conducting business, and assesses program trends to better determine further directions to enhance waste programs cleanup and reuse. This training is sponsored by EPA's Land Revitalization Staff. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ecorestoration4_092106/

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====>Listen to "Using Brownfields Grants for Watershed Restoration and Revitalization: Sep 20, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

This Webcast will highlight funding available to states, communities, and other stakeholders under the Brownfields Program. The Brownfields Program works with these groups to assess, safely clean up, and reuse Brownfields. "Brownfields" are lands that typically have hazardous substances and which are redeveloped and reused under this program. The Webcast will showcase the Black Warrior-Cahaba Rivers Land Trust in Jefferson County, Alabama, which has received a $200,000 Brownfields Assessment Grant for the Five Mile Creek Project. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/owbfgrants_092006/

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====>Listen to "Using Brownfields Grants for Watershed Restoration and Revitalization: Sep 20, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

This Webcast will highlight funding available to states, communities, and other stakeholders under the Brownfields Program. The Brownfields Program works with these groups to assess, safely clean up, and reuse Brownfields. "Brownfields" are lands that typically have hazardous substances and which are redeveloped and reused under this program. The Webcast will showcase the Black Warrior-Cahaba Rivers Land Trust in Jefferson County, Alabama, which has received a $200,000 Brownfields Assessment Grant for the Five Mile Creek Project. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/owbfgrants_092006/

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====>Listen to "Uses of Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA): Aug 15, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is free software that incorporates tools from environmental assessment fields into an effective problem solving environment. These tools include integrated modules for visualization, geospatial analysis, statistical analysis, human health risk assessment, ecological risk assessment, cost/benefit analysis, sampling design, and decision analysis. This seminar will highlight the tools uses, but is not a tutorial for the software. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/sada_081506/

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====>Listen to "Uses of Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA): Aug 15, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is free software that incorporates tools from environmental assessment fields into an effective problem solving environment. These tools include integrated modules for visualization, geospatial analysis, statistical analysis, human health risk assessment, ecological risk assessment, cost/benefit analysis, sampling design, and decision analysis. This seminar will highlight the tools uses, but is not a tutorial for the software. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/sada_081506/

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====>Listen to "Benefits of Watershed-Based NPDES Permitting: Jul 19, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

EPA is encouraging a watershed-based approach to permitting and is promoting this through its National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Program. EPA recently issued several policy memos and guidance to promote watershed-based permitting. Webcast instructors will discuss the benefits of watershed-based permitting, present an explanation of the process and several mechanisms to implement watershed-based permitting, and outline how EPA will encourage this approach. The instructors will also discuss issues related to managing stormwater and other wet weather related impacts and present a case study related to activities in the City of Richmond, VA designed to move toward a watershed-based approach. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ownpdes_071906/

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====>Listen to "Benefits of Watershed-Based NPDES Permitting: Jul 19, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

EPA is encouraging a watershed-based approach to permitting and is promoting this through its National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Program. EPA recently issued several policy memos and guidance to promote watershed-based permitting. Webcast instructors will discuss the benefits of watershed-based permitting, present an explanation of the process and several mechanisms to implement watershed-based permitting, and outline how EPA will encourage this approach. The instructors will also discuss issues related to managing stormwater and other wet weather related impacts and present a case study related to activities in the City of Richmond, VA designed to move toward a watershed-based approach. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ownpdes_071906/

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====>Listen to "Uses of Rapid Assessment Tool (RAT): Jul 18, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

R.A.T. is mapping software that provides a real-time continuous data collection and assessment in the field. R.A.T. is being developed in-house by the FIELDS group as a standalone program and does not require any licensing. This seminar will highlight the tools uses. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/rat_071806/

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====>Listen to "Uses of Rapid Assessment Tool (RAT): Jul 18, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

R.A.T. is mapping software that provides a real-time continuous data collection and assessment in the field. R.A.T. is being developed in-house by the FIELDS group as a standalone program and does not require any licensing. This seminar will highlight the tools uses. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/rat_071806/

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====>Listen to "Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) Training: Jul 11, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

Most would agree this area of RCRA may be the most difficult to deal with. Why does wastewater have less waste than non-wastewater? How should underlying hazardous constituents be looked at? What is dilution and what is not? This is your chance to get review the basics — what the federal LDR regulations are, how to apply them as regulators, and even how they apply in real life. This presentation is focused on the federal regulations with the idea that the states often have more restrictive regulations or different interpretations. So, if you?re a little fuzzy on LDR, when treatment requires a WAP, what the record keeping requirements really are, or how alternative treatment standards apply, come on in! Bring your questions. A state speaker will assist our primary speaker from EPA. Please note that this seminar consists of two, one-hour sessions with a 15-minute break. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ldr_071106/

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====>Listen to "Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) Training: Jul 11, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

Most would agree this area of RCRA may be the most difficult to deal with. Why does wastewater have less waste than non-wastewater? How should underlying hazardous constituents be looked at? What is dilution and what is not? This is your chance to get review the basics — what the federal LDR regulations are, how to apply them as regulators, and even how they apply in real life. This presentation is focused on the federal regulations with the idea that the states often have more restrictive regulations or different interpretations. So, if you?re a little fuzzy on LDR, when treatment requires a WAP, what the record keeping requirements really are, or how alternative treatment standards apply, come on in! Bring your questions. A state speaker will assist our primary speaker from EPA. Please note that this seminar consists of two, one-hour sessions with a 15-minute break. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/ldr_071106/

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====>Listen to "" Influencing Behaviors Using Social Marketing: Jun 28, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)

Thanks largely to effective discharge regulations over the past 30 years, the quality of our water resources has improved dramatically. However, many human activities still have negative impacts on the quality of our waterways. Watershed practitioners increasingly rely on nontraditional approaches to encourage people to alter their everyday behaviors and help improve and protect our waters. These approaches include social marketing techniques, which apply traditional commercial marketing approaches to address social issues. Webcast instructors will provide an overview of social marketing principles and then proceed through the steps needed to make audiences aware of an issue, recognize audiences underlying motivations, and solicit behavior change. The presentation will also highlight the key social marketing principles used in the Chesapeake Club campaign developed to change behaviors in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/owinbema_062806/

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====>Listen to "Influencing Behaviors Using Social Marketing: Jun 28, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

Thanks largely to effective discharge regulations over the past 30 years, the quality of our water resources has improved dramatically. However, many human activities still have negative impacts on the quality of our waterways. Watershed practitioners increasingly rely on nontraditional approaches to encourage people to alter their everyday behaviors and help improve and protect our waters. These approaches include social marketing techniques, which apply traditional commercial marketing approaches to address social issues. Webcast instructors will provide an overview of social marketing principles and then proceed through the steps needed to make audiences aware of an issue, recognize audiences underlying motivations, and solicit behavior change. The presentation will also highlight the key social marketing principles used in the Chesapeake Club campaign developed to change behaviors in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/owinbema_062806/

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====>Listen to "Permeable Reactive Barriers: Lessons Learned and New Directions: Jun 15, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is a continuous, in situ permeable treatment zone designed to intercept and remediate a contaminant plume. PRBs are often intended as a source-term management remedy or as an on-site containment remedy. Over the past 10 years, the use of iron-based PRBs has evolved from innovative to accepted standard practice for the containment and treatment of a variety of groundwater contaminants. Reactive media such as carbon sources (compost), limestone, granular activated carbon, zeolites, and others had also been deployed in recent years to treat metals and some organic compounds. Research and deployment of bio-barrier systems is also growing in recent years, particularly for treatment of chlorinated solvents and petroleum hydrocarbon constituents. This training presents updated information regarding new developments, innovative approaches, and lessons learned in the application of PRBs to treat a variety of groundwater contaminants. The information will be presented by reviewing the approaches and results at several sites where PRBs have been deployed. The training is based on the ITRC guidance document titled Permeable Reactive Barriers: Lessons Learned / New Directions (PRB-4, 2005). Case studies from around the country are included in the training to show various designs, contaminants, reactive media, and cost data for PRB systems. The training provides new information on iron-based PRB systems while providing a solid introduction to the non-iron PRBs. As a prerequisite to this course, we ask that you review background information on PRBs as presented in the material from earlier ITRC PRB training courses. You can access archives of these trainings at http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/advprb_032102/ and http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/prb_031902/. Three other documents produced by the ITRC PRB team are also available for review. They can be downloaded from the ITRC Web site under 'Guidance Documents.' To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/prbll_061506/

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====>Listen to "Permeable Reactive Barriers: Lessons Learned and New Directions: Jun 15, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is a continuous, in situ permeable treatment zone designed to intercept and remediate a contaminant plume. PRBs are often intended as a source-term management remedy or as an on-site containment remedy. Over the past 10 years, the use of iron-based PRBs has evolved from innovative to accepted standard practice for the containment and treatment of a variety of groundwater contaminants. Reactive media such as carbon sources (compost), limestone, granular activated carbon, zeolites, and others had also been deployed in recent years to treat metals and some organic compounds. Research and deployment of bio-barrier systems is also growing in recent years, particularly for treatment of chlorinated solvents and petroleum hydrocarbon constituents. This training presents updated information regarding new developments, innovative approaches, and lessons learned in the application of PRBs to treat a variety of groundwater contaminants. The information will be presented by reviewing the approaches and results at several sites where PRBs have been deployed. The training is based on the ITRC guidance document titled Permeable Reactive Barriers: Lessons Learned / New Directions (PRB-4, 2005). Case studies from around the country are included in the training to show various designs, contaminants, reactive media, and cost data for PRB systems. The training provides new information on iron-based PRB systems while providing a solid introduction to the non-iron PRBs. As a prerequisite to this course, we ask that you review background information on PRBs as presented in the material from earlier ITRC PRB training courses. You can access archives of these trainings at http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/advprb_032102/ and http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/prb_031902/. Three other documents produced by the ITRC PRB team are also available for review. They can be downloaded from the ITRC Web site under 'Guidance Documents.' To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/prbll_061506/

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====>Listen to "Integrating Wetlands into Watershed Protection Efforts: May 17, 2006 (Part 1 of 2)"

In celebration of American Wetlands Month, this Webcast will explore key ways of integrating wetland protection into local watershed management efforts. The focus will be on wetlands located in rural, suburban and urban settings and how they are directly and indirectly impacted by land development. The Webcast will describe how the eight tools of watershed protection can be adapted to strengthen wetland protection, conservation and restoration. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/owinwetpro_051706/

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====>Listen to "Integrating Wetlands into Watershed Protection Efforts: May 17, 2006 (Part 2 of 2)"

In celebration of American Wetlands Month, this Webcast will explore key ways of integrating wetland protection into local watershed management efforts. The focus will be on wetlands located in rural, suburban and urban settings and how they are directly and indirectly impacted by land development. The Webcast will describe how the eight tools of watershed protection can be adapted to strengthen wetland protection, conservation and restoration. To view the slides associated with this audio, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/owinwetpro_051706/

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Please visit the Hazardous Waste Clean-Up Information (CLU-IN) site: http://www.clu-in.org/live/archive.cfm to find many other valuable audio training presentations.

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Copyright © 2006 Hazardous Waste Clean-Up Information, All Rights Reserved.

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